Minnesota Makes Semi-Final List to Host National FFA Convention

The 60,000-attendee convention has a $30 million economic impact.

Meet Minneapolis, the Official Convention and Visitors Association, says that Minneapolis is a semi-finalist for the National Future Farmers of America annual convention from 2013 through 2019, with a three-year option through 2022.

Minneapolis is competing against four cities for the convention - Indianapolis, Ind.; Kansas City, Mo.; Louisville, Ky. and Nashville, Tenn. FFA will visit each of the prospective cities to determine which city will host its national convention.

Minnesota's strong corporate base, quality venues, strong agri-business community, research and education institutions all make Minneapolis a competitive location for the National FFA Convention.

The convention would take place at the Minneapolis Convention Center, Target Center, Minnesota State Fairgrounds and Xcel Energy Center. More than 100 metro-area hotels would provide housing for the convention.

FFA will visit Minneapolis in mid-December. Members of Meet Minneapolis, the Minneapolis Convention Center and the Target Center will lead the bid process with local FFA organizations and the University of Minnesota playing a critical role. FFA will make its final decision in fall of 2008.

FFA is a national not-for-profit youth organization that offers career exploration opportunities, educational and leadership training and serves as a meeting ground for agri-business and corporate leaders nationwide. The convention is the largest youth convention in the nation with nearly 60,000 attendees per year.

The selected city will host the annual convention in late October or early November from 2013-2019.

For more information, contact Allie Gray, communications coordinator, 612.767.8024, [email protected].

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