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SAFETY CHECK: The Upper Midwest Ag Safety and Health Center offers an electrical safety checklist for farmers to review to ensure that family members and employees are working in safe conditions.

Work safely around farm electrical equipment

Review the Upper Midwest Ag Safety and Health Center’s latest safety checklist.

In an ongoing effort to focus on farm safety, the Upper Midwest Agricultural Safety and Health Center is selecting one topic each month and providing a checklist for farmers to review.

Its latest checklist covers electrical safety.

Electrical safety is key to prevent fires, injuries, electrocution and potential death, says UMASH.

Take a look at possible electrical hazards on your farm by starting with this checklist:

• Are all electrical outlets grounded to accommodate (three -wire) appliances and equipment?
• Are electric wires firmly supported or in conduit?
• Are all electrical cords in good condition (not cracked, broken or brittle)?
• Are stationary power tools properly grounded?
• Can electrical equipment be locked in the “off” position, particularly when equipment is being repaired or serviced? Is a lock available?
• Are all workers aware of overhead power lines?
• Are plugs, sockets and switches in good condition (not broken or with exposed wiring)?
• Do all workers know how to shut off the power in case of an emergency?

You can download the UMASH safety checklist, too.

Prior farm safety checklists cover farm buildings and shops and chemical storage areas. See "Related" links above.

UMASH is a collaborative effort among the University of Minnesota School of Public Health, the U-M College of Veterinary Medicine, the Minnesota Department of Health and the National Farm Medicine Center in Marshfield, Wis. The expertise of the multidisciplinary group provides information and education in occupational health and safety issues in agriculture.

Source: UMASH

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